Three Orations on the Agrarian Law, the Four Against Catiline, the Orations for Rabirius, Murena Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, Etc Volume 2

Three Orations on the Agrarian Law, the Four Against Catiline, the Orations for Rabirius, Murena Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, Etc Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 edition. Excerpt: ...came on, he wore a breastplate under his robe for his protection; by which precaution he prevented Catiline from executing his design of murdering him and his competitors for the consulship, of whom Deems Junius Silaaus and Lucius Licinius Murena were elected. Catiline was rendered desperate by this his second defeat, and resolved without farther delay to attempt the execution of all his schemes. His greatest hopes lay in Sylla's veteran soldiers, whose cause he bad always espoused. They were scattered about in the different districts and colonies of Italy; but he had actually enlisted a. consider able body of them in Etnjria, and formed them into a little arny under the command of Manlius, a centurion of considerable military experience, who was only waiting for his orders. He was joined iq his conspiracy by several senators of profligate lives and desperate fortunes, of whom the chiefs were Publius Cornelius Lentulus, G'aius Cethegus, Fublius Autrouius, Lucius Cassius Longinus, Marcus Porcius Lecca, Fublius Sylla, Servilius Sylla, Quiutus Curius, Luciim Vargunteius, Quintus Annius, and Lucius Bestia. These men re-Bolved that a general insurrection should be raised throughout all Italy; that Catiline should put himself at the head of the troops in Etruria; that Borne should be set on fire in many places at once; and that a general massacre should be made of all the senate, and of all their enemies, of whom none were to be spared but the sons of Pompey, who were to be kept as hostages, and as a check upon their father, who was in command in the east. Lentulus was to be president of their councils, Cassius was to manage the firing of the city, and Cethegus the massacre. But, as the vigilance of Cicero was the greatest obstacle to their success, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 216 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 395g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236664574
  • 9781236664570