Three Letters of Philoxenus, Bishop of Mabbogh (485-519); Being the Letter to the Monks, the First Letter to the Monks of Beth-Gaugal, and the Letter to Emperor Zeno

Three Letters of Philoxenus, Bishop of Mabbogh (485-519); Being the Letter to the Monks, the First Letter to the Monks of Beth-Gaugal, and the Letter to Emperor Zeno

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1902 edition. Excerpt: ...be 'We have handled and have seen with our eyes the Word of life' if it was an appearance and not a reality that was assumed, as the blasphemer Eutyches said? How can this be 'We have handled the Word ', if, as he says, it was an appearance that was handled? And this again 'Touch and see because I have flesh and bones?' Therefore, let us cry out against these two (Nestorius and Eutyches) with a voice full of truth and life and faith, that He Who was touched was God incarnate, the Word (l) Guidi, op. cit., fol. 20a, col. 2, line 16-fol. 20b, col. 1, line 21. Who became flesh truly, not a man distinct from God, nor an appearance without reality - ('). Not only does Philoxenus insist on the reality of the humanity of Christ, but he urges against his opponents the irresistible argument that, if the body of Christ was not real, two of the great ends of the Incarnation--the reparation of fallen human nature and our sonship with God through Christ--could not be obtained (2). Thus in the Letter to Zeno, he says: - For He (the Word) did not bring to Himself a body from heaven as the foolish Valentinus and Bardesanes assert; nor was His embodiment from nothing, because He did not wish to redeem a creature that did not exist, but He wished to renew that which, created by Him, had become old - (3). In the Letter to the Monks he says that, unless the Son of God took upon Himself our humanity, we could not have become the sons of God: - Herein then is a great mystery of profound love and of ineffable salvation, that He Who is became, not that He might be since He is, but that we, through His becoming (Incarnation), might become the sons of God - (4). And again, in the Letter to Zeno, - The Word, therefore, became something that He...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 42 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236624424
  • 9781236624420