Three-Colour Photography; Three-Colour Printing and the Production of Photographic Pigment Pictures in Natural Colours

Three-Colour Photography; Three-Colour Printing and the Production of Photographic Pigment Pictures in Natural Colours

By (author)  , By (author) 

List price: US$14.14

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ...blue green, red, pink, etc. It must further be remarked that the spectral portions in front of C and after G need not be considered, because the absorption of such weak light does not influence the colour of a body materially (page 63), and further, that the middle absorption in our illustration does not correspond to the theoretically correct fundamental colour system, but has been assumed so as to make further explanations as simple as possible. Pigments, absorbing the middle and the limits of the spectrum, would show the colours: purple, greenish yellow, and green, which is a useless colour system for three-colour printing. The reproduction of the colours of the original by mixing the three fundamental colours corresponds to a 50 40 30 20 10 600 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 500 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 t distribution of its absorption band over the parts B, R and Y of the spectrum. To solve this problem, we must imagine this band to consist of several elementary bands, and the action of each of them to be represented in B, R and Y. Element m can be replaced by absorption band on R and Y, and as the distance between R and Y can be considered as a mixing line, it follows that the intensities of these bands are inversely proportional to the distance of point m from R and Y. In this way we are enabled to decompose every band element between if and Y, and we can further distribute the absorption band between B and R over those two points. The result of such a decomposition is illustrated in II. The intensity of R is governed by the whole absorption band of the original colour, but for the intensities placed in Y and B we are only to consider the spaces Y R and B R. The pigment characterised by the absorption spectrum II is due to a mixture of the three...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 44 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236645995
  • 9781236645999