Thought and Expression in the Sixteenth Century; Book I. the Humanism of Italy. Book II. Erasmus and Luther. Book III. the French Mind

Thought and Expression in the Sixteenth Century; Book I. the Humanism of Italy. Book II. Erasmus and Luther. Book III. the French Mind

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ...of his very self. But before examining that writing, it were well to remember the lines of antecedents which drew together into this burning nature, and then observe the youthful fermentation preceding the explosion. The inner verity (or falsity!) and outward facts of Luther's life--themes of whole libraries! Of outward facts it will be recalled that he was born at Eisleben in 1483 of well-to-do peasant stock. While he was a baby, his parents moved to the neighboring town of Mansfield, where mining was the chief industry. His father became a miner, a work for which the boy Martin showed himself unfit; the mines impressed him as murky places where devils bewitch and fool men with pockets of false ore, which were not so easy in the light of day. From his childhood to his dying day Luther believed in devils present and perceptible, perplexing men and hindering them, filling them with wicked doubts and devilish fears. One remembers his circumstantial story of devils throwing hazel nuts at him in bed in his chamber at the Wartburg. In due course he was sent away from home to schools (of which he has little good to say) at Magdeburg, and then at Eisenach, where his pleasing boy's voice, singing in the street for his supper, won him the affection of Frau Cotta, wife of a prosperous merchant. When seventeen he entered the flourishing university of Erfurt. There he pursued philosophy of the scholastic type, adhering to the popular and progressive nominalism of Occam. A band of youthful humanists were gathering there at Erfurt. But Luther was never tempted toward classicism of style, though his earliest letters are not free from current humanistic phrases. He read the usual Latin authors, and became as ready with that tongue as he was with his mother...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 144 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 268g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236562844
  • 9781236562845