The Theory and Practice of Ship-Building. with Portions of the Treatise on Naval Architecture [From the Encyclopaedia Britannica] by A.F.B. Creuze. Steam-Ships by R. Murray

The Theory and Practice of Ship-Building. with Portions of the Treatise on Naval Architecture [From the Encyclopaedia Britannica] by A.F.B. Creuze. Steam-Ships by R. Murray

By (author) 

List price: US$24.75

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1861 edition. Excerpt: ... water, and more than one-third of the whole length of the vessel was left totally unsupported, overhanging the wharf, and yet she did not break or receive any damage. The same elements of strength which enabled these vessels, especially the Great Britain and the Vanguard, to withstand the strain to which they were exposed, will also be efficacious in preventing a vessel straining at sea in a heavy sea-way, so as to become leaky and founder at sea from this cause. From a consideration of such facts as the foregoing, the general opinion appears to be, that iron-vessels, as a whole, are not only stronger than wooden vessels, generally speaking, but that they may be made of greater or equal strength, with considerably less weight of hull. The extent to which this saving of weight may be carried, without impairing the strength to an improper or unsafe degree, will always be a subject of inquiry to the iron shipbuilder; but if he err in judgment and produce too weak a ship, the error must be attributed to him, and the material must not be considered to be in fault. The power of fitting water-tight bulkheads to iron-vessels is also a great advantage, and will be a source of much greater security hereafter, when vessels are better built than they have hitherto been. Their importance, and the great additional safety which they impart, are evident, and the principle may be carried out to any extent, and this longitudinally as well as athwartship. In the after part of screwships, the passage alongside of the shaft to the propeller may be made water-tight, and communication with the engine-room may be cut off, if it be desired, and if proper arrangements be made for this purpose. These bulkheads also form a good protection against the very rapid spreading...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 160 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 299g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236626915
  • 9781236626912