The Theory and Practice of Lettering; Designed for the Use of Engineers and Draftsmen Generally But Especially for the Use of Students in Engineering

The Theory and Practice of Lettering; Designed for the Use of Engineers and Draftsmen Generally But Especially for the Use of Students in Engineering

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ...correct shapes as given in plate I, should be carefully noted. P is similar to the corresponding portion of B, with the exception that stroke 3 in P is a trifle below the middle. Stroke 5 is first made vertical and straight and then rounded at each end into 4. B. The lower lobe is about i unit wider than the upper. Strokes and 7 are made straight verticals at first and then rounded into 4 and 5; but these two stems must be joined by hairlines. This remark applies also to the R following. The effect of running the two curved stems together is shown in the first B, and is a mistake commonly made. D. Its width is determined as in all the previous letters, by first drawing a square and reducing this by the correct amount. Make stroke 4 a vertical straight line first and then round its extremities into stroke 3. Guard against running the curved stem around upon the guide lines; as shown in plate I a small portion of hairline should intervene between the curved stem and the guide lines at either extremity. U. The method of construction is sufficiently indicated in the cut. J. The left-hand portion extends up two units or more from the lower guide. Finish the lobe as a complete circle before filling in the angle between strokes 2 and 5 as shown in plate I. This angle, in small letters, needs little or no filling. R is perhaps incorrectly drawn as often as any letter of the alphabet, the mistakes most frequently made being to run the two curved stems together, and to run the lower curved stem around upon stroke 8 as shown in the second R. The curved parts of the letters C O and Q are arcs of ellipses. Not infrequently the beginner makes these letters of the general shape shown in the first O of the following cut, his idea being that the letter is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236968816
  • 9781236968814