Theory of the Earth, Or, the Periodically Recurring Superficial Changes, or Geological Revolutions in the Earth's Crust; Also, the Changes in the Organic World Indicated in the Geological Record...

Theory of the Earth, Or, the Periodically Recurring Superficial Changes, or Geological Revolutions in the Earth's Crust; Also, the Changes in the Organic World Indicated in the Geological Record...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1875 edition. Excerpt: ...This process repeated annually for thousands of centuries, interrupted occasionally by chance inundations, consequent, perhaps, on the exceptional exposure of some vast body of ice to the rays of the summer sun, the eflect of which would be the interposition of a stratum of earthy material in the vegetable deposit, seems most in accord with the phenomena of the Carboniferous period; and the same phenomena, indicating unmistakably an analogy of climate between low temperate and polar latitudes, furnish us with an unanswerable argument, among many others, in favor of the theory of the transverse rotation of the earth. Davonian, Period.--Placing implicit reliance on evidence derived from greater or less degrees of structural resemblance between the fossils of the Triassic, Permian, Carboniferous, Davonian, and the still older Silurian and Cambrian systems, and still living organisms, --a species of evidence we hold to have become, at this stage of our retrospect, entirely worthless as a means of determining the climatal conditions of those remote eras, ---Lyell arrives at the conclusion that " a similarity of conditions in regard to temperature prevailed throughout the whole of these six periods." These supposititious conditions, as we have noted in the cases of the first-named three, are assumed to result in a climate described as " warm, moist, and equable," and the same conditions are assigned to the Davonian, Silurian, and Cambrian epochs. It seems proper, in this connection, to reassert the fact that such uniformity of climate which, from the terms employed, we are to understand-as prevailing generally throughout the entire year, and over the whole earth, is, and in the nature of things must be, a manifest physical...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 96 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 186g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236767462
  • 9781236767462