Theory Change in Science
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Theory Change in Science : Strategies from Mendelian Genetics

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Description

This challenging and innovative book examines the processes involved in the birth and development of new scientific ideas. The author has searched for strategies used by scientists for producing new theories, both those that yield a range of plausible hypotheses and ones that aid in narrowing that range. She goes on to focus on the development of the theory of the gene as a case study in scientific creativity. Her discussion of modern genetics greatly demystifies the philosophy of science, and establishes a realistic framework for understanding how scientists actually go about their work.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 326 pages
  • 162.8 x 243.8 x 29.5mm | 686.75g
  • Oxford University Press Inc
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • halftones, line drawings
  • 0195067975
  • 9780195067972

Review quote

"This will be a welcome and useful book for all those interested in the history and philosophy of genetics. Although primarily a philosopher of science, Lindley Darden has crafted a unique and challenging fusion of an historical with a philosophical approach. Refreshingly, she is not concerned with what ought to have been done, but what was done. Darden's book has a number of strong points: perhaps the most important of which is its attempt to show the underlying conceptual changes through which Mendelian theory underwent after 1900 in terms of several general strategies advocated by its proponents." --Mendel Newsletter"Darden traces the mutual influences of theory and experiment very well, giving due weight to alternative models that were later deemed inadequate. Darden is developing a rigorous procedure for understanding how theories are formulated, modified, accepted, and rejected." --The Quarterly Review of Biology"A welcome and useful book for all those interested in the history and philosophy of genetics. . . . a unique and challenging fusion of a historical approach and a philosophical one. Darden has a good historical sense and presents to the reader questions and problems as they might have been viewed by investigators at the time, and not as we see them from today's perspective. . . . meticulous in illustrating the various strategies she describes by specific examples. . . . a refreshing approach." --Bulletin of the History of Medicine"The most successful attempt I know to 'remove some of the mystery from the development of new scientific ideas.' Darden develops a theoretical model of scientific change from a detailed historical reconstruction. The merit of the book is to show the richness and the variability of the territory and to discuss in detail the adequacies and inadequacies of the proposed map. For its clarity, rational construction, and readability, this book should be used as a textbook. . . . will be a useful tool and a source of many insights for both historians of biology and philosophers of science. . . . has a great didactic value." --ISIS"[Darden's] book demonstrates the enormous value that a careful study of the history of science has for philosophers of science. . . . There is little to find fault with in Darden's book. The historical treatment of the development of Mendelian theory is thorough. . . . It is impossible to do justice to the scope and richness of Darden's book in a short review; suffice it to say that her book exemplifies a successful strategy for bringing together the history of science and the philosophy of science."--Bradley E. Wilson, University of Pittsburgh "This will be a welcome and useful book for all those interested in the history and philosophy of genetics. Although primarily a philosopher of science, Lindley Darden has crafted a unique and challenging fusion of an historical with a philosophical approach. Refreshingly, she is not concerned with what ought to have been done, but what was done. Darden's book has a number of strong points: perhaps the most important of which is its attempt to show the underlying conceptual changes through which Mendelian theory underwent after 1900 in terms of several general strategies advocated by its proponents." --Mendel Newsletter"Darden traces the mutual influences of theory and experiment very well, giving due weight to alternative models that were later deemed inadequate. Darden is developing a rigorous procedure for understanding how theories are formulated, modified, accepted, and rejected." --The Quarterly Review of Biology"A welcome and useful book for all those interested in the history and philosophy of genetics. . . . a unique and challenging fusion of a historical approach and a philosophical one. Darden has a good historical sense and presents to the reader questions and problems as they might have been viewed by investigators at the time, and not as we see them from today's perspective. . . . meticulous in illustrating the various strategies she describes by specific examples. . . . a refreshing approach." --Bulletin of the History of Medicine"The most successful attempt I know to 'remove some of the mystery from the development of new scientific ideas.' Darden develops a theoretical model of scientific change from a detailed historical reconstruction. The merit of the book is to show the richness and the variability of the territory and to discuss in detail the adequacies and inadequacies of the proposed map. For its clarity, rational construction, and readability, this book should be used as a textbook. . . . will be a useful tool and a source of many insights for both historians of biology and philosophers of science. . . . has a great didactic value." --ISIS"[Darden's] book demonstrates the enormous value that a careful study of the history of science has for philosophers of science. . . . There is little to find fault with in Darden's book. The historical treatment of the development of Mendelian theory is thorough. . . . It is impossible to do justice to the scope and richness of Darden's book in a short review; suffice it to say that her book exemplifies a successful strategy for bringing together the history of science and the philosophy of science."--Bradley E. Wilson, University of Pittsburgh "This will be a welcome and useful book for all those interested in the history and philosophy of genetics. Although primarily a philosopher of science, Lindley Darden has crafted a unique and challenging fusion of an historical with a philosophical approach. Refreshingly, she is not concerned with what ought to have been done, but what was done. Darden's book has a number of strong points: perhaps the most important of which is its attempt to show the underlying conceptual changes through which Mendelian theory underwent after 1900 in terms of several general strategies advocated by its proponents." --Mendel Newsletter "Darden traces the mutual influences of theory and experiment very well, giving due weight to alternative models that were later deemed inadequate. Darden is developing a rigorous procedure for understanding how theories are formulated, modified, accepted, and rejected." --The Quarterly Review of Biology "A welcome and useful book for all those interested in the history and philosophy of genetics. . . . a unique and challenging fusion of a historical approach and a philosophical one. Darden has a good historical sense and presents to the reader questions and problems as they might have been viewed by investigators at the time, and not as we see them from today's perspective. . . . meticulous in illustrating the various strategies she describes by specific examples. . . . a refreshing approach." --Bulletin of the History of Medicine "The most successful attempt I know to 'remove some of the mystery from the development of new scientific ideas.' Darden develops a theoretical model of scientific change from a detailed historical reconstruction. The merit ofthe book is to show the richness and the variability of the territory and to discuss in detail the adequacies and inadequacies of the proposed map. For its clarity, rational construction, and readability, this book should be used as a textbook. . . . will be a useful tool and a source of many insights for both historians of biology and philosophers of science. . . . has a great didactic value." --ISIS "[Darden's] book demonstrates the enormous value that a careful study of the history of science has for philosophers of science. . . . There is little to find fault with in Darden's book. The historical treatment of the development of Mendelian theory is thorough. . . . It is impossible to do justice to the scope and richness of Darden's book in a short review; suffice it to say that her book exemplifies a successful strategy for bringing together the history of science and the philosophy of science."--Bradley E. Wilson, University of Pittsburgh "This will be a welcome and useful book for all those interested in the history and philosophy of genetics. Although primarily a philosopher of science, Lindley Darden has crafted a unique and challenging fusion of an historical with a philosophical approach. Refreshingly, she is not concerned with what ought to have been done, but what was done. Darden's book has a number of strong points: perhaps the most important of which is its attempt to show the underlying conceptual changes through which Mendelian theory underwent after 1900 in terms of several general strategies advocated by its proponents." --Mendel Newsletter "Darden traces the mutual influences of theory and experiment very well, giving due weight to alternative models that were later deemed inadequate. Darden is developing a rigorous procedure for understanding how theories are formulated, modified, accepted, and rejected." --The Quarterly Review of Biology "A welcome and useful book for all those interested in the history and philosophy of genetics. . . . a unique and challenging fusion of a historical approach and a philosophical one. Darden has a good historical sense and presents to the reader questions and problems as they might have been viewed by investigators at the time, and not as we see them from today's perspective. . . . meticulous in illustrating the various strategies she describes by specific examples. . . . a refreshing approach." --Bulletin of the History of Medicine "The most successful attempt I know to 'remove some of the mystery from the development of new scientific ideas.' Darden develops a theoretical model of scientific changefrom a detailed historical reconstruction. The merit of the book is to show the richness and the variability of the territory and to discuss in detail the adequacies and inadequacies of the proposed map. For its clarity, rational construction, and readability, this book should be used as a textbook. . . . will be a useful tool and a source of many insights for both historians of biology and philosophers of science. . . . has a great didactic value." --ISIS "[Darden's] book demonstrates the enormous value that a careful study of the history of science has for philosophers of science. . . . There is little to find fault with in Darden's book. The historical treatment of the development of Mendelian theory is thorough. . . . It is impossible to do justice to the scope and richness of Darden's book in a short review; suffice it to say that her book exemplifies a successful strategy for bringing together the history of science and the philosophy of science."--Bradley E. Wilson, University of Pittsburgh "This will be a welcome and useful book for all those interested in the history and philosophy of genetics. Although primarily a philosopher of science, Lindley Darden has crafted a unique and challenging fusion of an historical with a philosophical approach. Refreshingly, she is not concerned withwhat ought to have been done, but what was done. Darden's book has a number of strong points: perhaps the most important of which is its attempt to show the underlying conceptual changes through which Mendelian theory underwent after 1900 in terms of several general strategies advocated by itsproponents." --Mendel Newsletter"Darden traces the mutual influences of theory and experiment very well, giving due weight to alternative models that were later deemed inadequate. Darden is developing a rigorous procedure for understanding how theories are formulated, modified, accepted, and rejected." --The Quarterly Review ofBiology"A welcome and useful book for all those interested in the history and philosophy of genetics. . . . a unique and challenging fusion of a historical approach and a philosophical one. Darden has a good historical sense and presents to the reader questions and problems as they might have been viewedby investigators at the time, and not as we see them from today's perspective. . . . meticulous in illustrating the various strategies she describes by specific examples. . . . a refreshing approach." --Bulletin of the History of Medicine"The most successful attempt I know to 'remove some of the mystery from the development of new scientific ideas.' Darden develops a theoretical model of scientific change from a detailed historical reconstruction. Themerit of the book is to show the richness and the variability of the territory andto discuss in detail the adequacies and inadequacies of the proposed map. For its clarity, rational construction, and readability, this book should be used as a textbook. . . . will be a useful tool and a source of many insights for both historians of biology and philosophers of science. . . . has agreat didactic value." --ISIS"[Darden's] book demonstrates the enormous value that a careful study of the history of science has for philosophers of science. . . . There is little to find fault with in Darden's book. The historical treatment of the development of Mendelian theory is thorough. . . . It is impossible to dojustice to the scope and richness of Darden's book in a short review; suffice it to say that her book exemplifies a successful strategy for bringing together the history of science and the philosophy of science."--Bradley E. Wilson, University of Pittsburghshow more

Table of contents

Introduction; Philosophical preliminaries; The problem of heredity; Historical introduction; Mendelism, 1900-1903; Unit-characters, pairs, and dominance; Boveri-Sutton chromosome theory; Tests of segregation; Reduplication, linkage, and Mendel's second law; The chromosome theory and mutation; Unit-characters to factors to genes; Exemplars, diagrams, and diagnosis; Genetics and other fields; Summary of strategies for theory change; Implications for further work.show more

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