Theory and Art of Penmanship; A Manual for Teachers, Containing a Full Statement of Payson, Dunton, and Scribner's Celebrated Method of Teaching; Including Class-Drill, Writing in Concert, Criticism and Correction of Errors, Hints Towards

Theory and Art of Penmanship; A Manual for Teachers, Containing a Full Statement of Payson, Dunton, and Scribner's Celebrated Method of Teaching; Including Class-Drill, Writing in Concert, Criticism and Correction of Errors, Hints Towards

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1864 edition. Excerpt: ...below the base line. Both on the main slope. 0. A direct oval, simple, closed at the top, shaded on the left side. Height, one space and a half. No connecting line unless joined to another, then like o. SECTION II. ANALYSIS OF THE CAPITALS. The Principles. The Principles of the Capitals are three in number. See Plate I. The first of these, which we shall call the Seventh Principle, there being six of the small letters, is known by several names, --the Line of.Beauty, the Double Curve, and the Capital-Stem. The next, that is, the Eighth, is the Direct Oval. The last, or Ninth, is the Inverted Oval. The Seventh Principle is a compound form, and is derived from two similar ovals, placed side by side. See Plate I. The upper and lower curve are similar, and each occupies half the length. Remark.--This is the ideal Double Curve. It is modified in different letters. In some, the upper curve almost approaches a straight line; in others, the lower curve is intensified. In some letters the slope is changed. The reason of this is, that the letter of which it is a part has to be considered as a whole, and an adjustment made to suit the laws of beauty and maintain the symmetry of the letter. The Eighth and Ninth Principles are compound forms, and are derived from two similar and equal ovals, whose width equals half the height, intersecting one another, so that the spaces, measured on the common short diameter, between the sides of the ovals, the sides and the diameters, and the diameters, shall all be equal. See Plate I. Draw the diameters to show these equal spaces, and the lines parallel to the shorter diameter to show the parallelism of the position of the two ovals. The two left curves are not parallel. To prove that they are not, draw two..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236794826
  • 9781236794826