A Theoretical and Practical Treatise on the Five Orders of Architecture; Containing the Most Plain and Simple Rules for Drawing and Executing Them in the Purest Style

A Theoretical and Practical Treatise on the Five Orders of Architecture; Containing the Most Plain and Simple Rules for Drawing and Executing Them in the Purest Style

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1853 edition. Excerpt: ...edifices of the fifteenth were themselves frequently in the form of plants, a freak which seems to overstep the bounds of architecture. This style of building, having outlived its prosperity, was the more easily superseded in the sixteenth century by a more modern Italian style. Although it is evidently shewn from this treatise of Mr. Moller, that the English cannot claim the merit of being the sole inventors of the style of architecture, called Gothic, yet, nevertheless, this style has been more extensively practised, and has become more varied in its forms, in England, than either in Italy, France, or Germany, and may be said to be the national architecture of this country. Mr. Rickman, in his work on Gothic Architecture, viewing it as national, has called it English Architecture, and has divided it into four distinct periods or styles, called Norman, Early English, Decorated English, and Perpendicular English. "The Norman style, according to Mr. Rickman, prevailed to the end of the reign of Henry II. in 1189, distinguished by its arches being generally semi-circular, though sometimes pointed, with bold and rude ornaments. This style seems to have commenced before the conquest, but we have no remains really known to be more than a very few years older." "The Early English style, reaching to the end of the reign of Edward I. in 1307, is distinguished by pointed arches, and long narrow windows, without mullions and a peculiar ornament, which, from its resemblance to the teeth of a shark, is called the toothed ornament." "Decorated English, reaching to the end of the reign of Edward III., in 1377, and perhaps from ten to fifteen years longer. This style is distinguished by its large windows, which have pointed arches, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 90 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236593200
  • 9781236593207