The Human Heart, One and Undivided
21%
off

The Human Heart, One and Undivided

By (author) 

Free delivery worldwide

Available. Expected delivery to the United States in 9-14 business days.


Not ordering to the United States? Click here.

Description

Following My Heart's Inspirations from Catholic Priest to Bahá'í




This remarkable book draws on the story of the 'watchman' told by Bahá'u'lláh in The Seven Valleys to describe the author's own life journey, from his first religious experience at the age of 4, his becoming a Catholic priest, losing his faith, to seeking meaning in life and at last finding it in the Bahá'í Faith. In parallel, it also presents the science of neurocardiology and how it has reestablished the importance of the heart for mental, emotional and physical well-being. Dr Klebel writes that the underlying unity of a person encompasses both the heart and the brain. The heart expresses itself through feelings, often today referred as 'emotional intelligence'. We know about the heart's decisions and conclusions only when they become conscious in the brain.



Describing the Bahá'í Faith as 'the religion of heart and unity', and quoting extensively from seminal Bahá'í texts, the author demonstrates how understanding the essential harmony between science and religion will have a major impact not only on global society but on our personal lives as well, leading to a 'human heart one and undivided'.
show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 194 pages
  • 127 x 203 x 11mm | 213g
  • English
  • 0853986363
  • 9780853986362
  • 2,487,777

Review quote

This remarkable and well-written book recalls how Dr Klebel became a Catholic priest, then left the priesthood and became a Bahá'í. He demonstrates how living from the heart has helped him find fulfilment in the Bahá'í Faith that he calls the religion of heart and unity. He describes how the nervous system of the heart has been called 'the little brain of the heart' and that it is undivided. In contrast, the nervous system of the 'cranial brain' is divided into a left and right hemisphere. He writes that the underlying unity of a person encompasses both the heart and the brain, the heart representing the unity and the brain representing the diversity in everyone. The heart expresses itself through our feelings, often today referred to as 'emotional intelligence'. We know about the heart's decisions and conclusions only when they become conscious in the brain. . .

He persuasively concludes that we must look at the heart with new eyes, seeing it as much more than a blood pump. In so doing, we may understand ourselves in finding a better way to human happiness. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has this goal.

Judge Dorothy W. Nelson
show more