The Brothers Karamazov
6%
off

The Brothers Karamazov

4.32 (266,398 ratings by Goodreads)
By (author)  , Introduction by 

Free delivery worldwide

Available. Expected delivery to the United States in 6-11 business days.


Not ordering to the United States? Click here.

Description

'The most magnificent novel ever written' Sigmund Freud

The murder of brutal landowner Fyodor Karamazov changes the lives of his sons irrevocably: Mitya, the sensualist, whose bitter rivalry with his father immediately places him under suspicion for parricide; Ivan, the intellectual, driven to breakdown; the spiritual Alyosha, who tries to heal the family's rifts; and the shadowy figure of their bastard half-brother, Smerdyakov. Dostoyevsky's dark masterwork evokes a world where the lines between innocence and corruption, good and evil, blur, and everyone's faith in humanity is tested.

Translated with an Introduction and notes by DAVID McDUFF
show more

Penguin Classics

Interested in all the books in this Series? Click here

Product details

  • Paperback | 1056 pages
  • 129 x 198 x 44mm | 713g
  • Penguin Classics
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • Reissue
  • Chronology, notes
  • 0140449248
  • 9780140449242
  • 1,524

Table of contents

The Brothers KaramazovChronology
Introduction
Further Reading
A Note on the Text
The Brothers Karamazov


Notes
show more

About Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Author)
Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky was born in Moscow in 1821. His debut, the epistolary novella Poor Folk(1846), made his name. In 1849 he was arrested for involvement with the politically subversive 'Petrashevsky circle' and until 1854 he lived in a convict prison in Omsk, Siberia. From this experience came The House of the Dead (1860-2). In 1860 he began the journal Vremya (Time). Already married, he fell in love with one of his contributors, Appollinaria Suslova, eighteen years his junior, and developed a ruinous passion for roulette. After the death of his first wife, Maria, in 1864, Dostoyevsky completed Notes from Underground and began work towards Crime and Punishment (1866). The major novels of his late period are The Idiot (1868), Demons(1871-2) and The Brothers Karamazov (1879-80). He died in 1881.

David McDuff (Introducer, Translator)
David McDuff's translations for Penguin Classics include Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov and The Idiot, and Babel's short stories.
show more

Rating details

266,398 ratings
4.32 out of 5 stars
5 55% (147,578)
4 28% (74,472)
3 12% (31,526)
2 3% (8,689)
1 2% (4,133)
Book ratings by Goodreads
Goodreads is the world's largest site for readers with over 50 million reviews. We're featuring millions of their reader ratings on our book pages to help you find your new favourite book. Close X