A Textbook of Chemical Philosophy on the Basis of Dr. Turner's Elements of Chemistry; In Which the Principal Discoveries and Doctrines of the Science Are Arranged in a New Systematic Order

A Textbook of Chemical Philosophy on the Basis of Dr. Turner's Elements of Chemistry; In Which the Principal Discoveries and Doctrines of the Science Are Arranged in a New Systematic Order

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1829 edition. Excerpt: ...crystals of nitrate of copper are coarsely powdered, sprinkled with a little water, and quickly rolled up in a sheet of tin foil, there is great heat produced, nitrous gas is rapidly evolved, and the metal often takes fire. If ammonia be added to solution of nitrate of copper, it occasions a precipitate of the hydrated peroxide, but if it be added in excess, the precipitate is re-dissolved, and an ammonia-nitrate of copper is produced. Carbonate of Copper.--The beautiful green mineral, called Malachite, is a carbonate of the peroxide of copper; and a similar compound may be formed from the persulphate by double decomposition, or by exposing metallic copper to air, and moisture. According to the analysis of malachite by Mr. Phillips, this mineral is composed of 80 parts or one atom of the peroxide of copper, one atom of carbonic acid, and one atom of water. The blue pigment called verditer, said to be prepared by decomposing the nitrite of copper by chalk, is an impure carbonate. Borate of Copper.--Solution of borax poured into sulphate of copper, produces a bulky pale green, precipitate of borate of copper. Silicate of Copper.--The mineral, called by the Germans emerald copper ore, and by the French dioptase, is a hydrous trisilicate of copper, if we consider the analysis of it by Lowitz as correct. Phosphate of Copper.--Phosphoric acid unites with peroxide of copper, in two proportions. If solutions of phosphate of soda and sulphate of copper be mingled together, a bluish green precipitate is formed, consisting of one proportional peroxide of copper, two of phosphoric acid, and one of water; it is therefore a biphosphate. The phosphate has not yet been formed artificially, but has been found native of an emerald green colour. Sulphates of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 262 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 472g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236503724
  • 9781236503725