A Text-Book of Geology; For Use in Universities, Colleges, Schools of Science, Etc., and for the General Reader. Part I. Physical Geology Volume 1-2

A Text-Book of Geology; For Use in Universities, Colleges, Schools of Science, Etc., and for the General Reader. Part I. Physical Geology Volume 1-2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1915 edition. Excerpt: ...345), and these rings segregated into nuclei and eventually condensed into planets. In their turn the planets condensed and repeated the process of annulation, thus giving origin to the satellites. In the case of the planetoids, the very small planets also known as minor planets or asteroids, the masses of the broken rings did not unite into a planet, but each part formed an asteroid. On the other hand, some of the rings of Saturn did not break but remained as rings. To account for the eccentricities in the orbits and their deviations from one plane of revolution, he imagined that there were numberless variations in the temperature of different parts of the nebula and in the densities of the nuclei, that is, it was a nebula that was clearly heterogeneous both as to density and temperature. He conceived of the earth as having passed from a gaseous to a liquid, and finally a solid condition, with absolute rigidity. Objections to Laplace's Theory.--Even though the nebular hypothesis of Laplace has so long dominated the world's thinking, objections and difficulties were brought forward at various times during the nineteenth century. According to Barrell, we may divide these into fundamental objections and modifying objections. Of the fundamental ones, perhaps the most readily appreciated is that concerning the energy of rotation of the system. This and others have been developed by Moulton, who worked with Chamberlin upon the larger problems of earth origin. The argument as developed is briefly as follows: If the mass of the solar system at one time revolved as a unit and at the same time condensed, toward the center it would gain in angular velocity of rotation, as is seen when agitated water converges toward the central part of an eddy. By virtue...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 374 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 20mm | 667g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236518357
  • 9781236518354