Testimony Taken by the Subcommittee on the Tariff of the Senate Committee on Finance in Connection with the Bill H.R. 9051; To Reduce Taxation and Simplify the Laws in Relation to the Collection of the Revenue ...

Testimony Taken by the Subcommittee on the Tariff of the Senate Committee on Finance in Connection with the Bill H.R. 9051; To Reduce Taxation and Simplify the Laws in Relation to the Collection of the Revenue ...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1888 edition. Excerpt: ...their clothing, which they are incorrectly taught to believe is a reduction to the same extent of the cost of their cloth. 'Is it conceivable that they will consent to give this op to carry out a compact of wool growers and manufacturers f The wool-growers may, with utmost good faith, pledge their best efforts; but what power have they of binding Congress to such action that the two measures restoring duties on wool and woolens shall stand or fall together? What power could the manufacturers wield for the restoration of the woolen duties in face of the fact that they originally consented to the reduction? What influence could they have in face of the indifference of the West, the old war animosities of the South, the waning political power of the East and North, and, above all, against the popular prejudice engendered by the demagogues' clamor of "untaxed clothing"? We say that the wool duties might be restored, but the woolen duties never. What then would be the position of the wool grower? His vittory would indeed be a barren one. He would have admitted wool in the most ruinous of all forms, that of goods. He would have destroyed his customers and have got his increased wool duties at the cost of his market. Of course such a state of things could not continue long. The wool manufacturers of the country, who saved the wool tariff at the last session of Congress, would rise en masse. The wool tariff would be swept away as with a whirlwind. And then destruction of flocks, dispersion of labor, lowering of wages, increased cost of clothing, increased cost of animal food, commercial and industrial depression, affecting sympathetically the whole nation, would follow, and all because a few political machinators representing the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 334 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 18mm | 599g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236886038
  • 9781236886033