The Terror in the French Revolution

The Terror in the French Revolution

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Description

We now live with the threat and the reality of political terror and terrorists. The French Revolution was the first occasion when a democratic government used terror as a political weapon, executing thousands of people for political crimes. What caused reasonable people to implement such a brutal regime? What did it achieve? What are its links with the terrors of the present day?

This established text examines a range of key issues, analyses the terror's background and traces the course from the fall of the Bastille in 1789 to the work of the guillotine during the terror of 1793-4. It puts the terror into context and shows how circumstances and ideas interacted to create an event that has haunted the political imagination of Europe ever since. Thoroughly revised in the light of recent scholarship and debates, this new edition of an essential introduction includes:

* an updated historiography section
* clearly set-out definitions of the 'terror' and more detail on its workings
* an entirely new chapter exploring the social and cultural policies of the Revolution
* an up-to-date bibliography, organised thematically for ease of reference.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 128 pages
  • 138 x 216 x 10.16mm | 1,952g
  • Red Globe Press
  • New York, United Kingdom
  • English
  • Revised
  • 2nd ed. 2010
  • 128 p.
  • 0230201814
  • 9780230201811
  • 720,330

Back cover copy

We now live with the threat and the reality of political terror and terrorists. The French Revolution was the first occasion when a democratic government used terror as a political weapon, executing thousands of people for political crimes. What caused reasonable people to implement such a brutal regime? What did it achieve? What are its links with the terrors of the present day?

This established text examines a range of key issues, analyses the terror's background and traces the course from the fall of the Bastille in 1789 to the work of the guillotine during the terror of 1793-4. It puts the terror into context and shows how circumstances and ideas interacted to create an event that has haunted the political imagination of Europe ever since. Thoroughly revised in the light of recent scholarship and debates, this new edition of an essential introduction includes:

- an updated historiography section
- clearly set-out definitions of the 'terror' and more detail on its workings
- an entirely new chapter exploring the social and cultural policies of the Revolution
- an up-to-date bibliography, organised thematically for ease of reference.
show more

Table of contents

Note on References.- Editors' Preface.- Preface to the Second Edition.- Historians and the Terror.- Prelude to Terror? From Revolution to Republic 1789-93.- Beginnings of Terror: March-September 1793.- Terror in Paris and the Provinces: September-December 1793.- Factions Liquidated: December 1793-April 1794.- The 'Great Terror': April-July 1794.- Creating New Citizens for the New Republic.- The Road to Thermidor and the End of Terror 1794-5.- Conclusion.- Chronology.- Bibliography.- Index.
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Review quote

Praise for the first edition: 'This is a pithy, readable textbook which acts as an excellent introduction to the reams of material which have been written on the terror.' - History, Journal of the Historical Association
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About Hugh Gough

HUGH GOUGH is Emeritus Professor of History at University College Dublin, Ireland. He has published extensively on the history of the French Revolution.
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Rating details

30 ratings
3.7 out of 5 stars
5 20% (6)
4 37% (11)
3 37% (11)
2 7% (2)
1 0% (0)
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