The Temperance Bible-Commentary; Giving at One View, Version, Criticism, and Exposition, in Regard to All Passages of Holy Writ Bearing on 'Wine' and 'Strong Drink, ' or Illustrating the Principles of the Temperance Reformation

The Temperance Bible-Commentary; Giving at One View, Version, Criticism, and Exposition, in Regard to All Passages of Holy Writ Bearing on 'Wine' and 'Strong Drink, ' or Illustrating the Principles of the Temperance Reformation

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1868 edition. Excerpt: ...from the wine of his drinking.' Lxx., kai apo tou oinou tou potou autou, 'and from the wine of his own drinking.' V., et de vino unde bibebat ipse, 'and from the wine whence he himself drank.' Under Nebuchadnezzar the Babylonian empire attained its greatest expansion and glory; but being founded on mere military supremacy, its decay was as rapid as its rise. Luxury enervated the Babylonian princes and nobles during times of peace; and while their food was dainty, their drinks were chosen with the view rather of exciting thirst than of allaying it. Chapter I. Verse 8. But Daniel purposed in his heart that he would not defile himself with the portion of the king's meat, nor with the wine which he drank: therefore he requested of the prince of the eunuchs that he might not defile himself. W1th The W1ne Wh1ch He Drank Hebrew, bl-yayin mishtahv, ' with the wine of his (the king's) drinking.' Daniel's scruples may have arisen from his knowledge of idolatrous rites used in connection with the king's provisions, --perhaps their ormal dedication to Bel before they were served up for the royal table. Chapter I. Verse 10. And the prince of the eunuchs said unto Daniel, I fear my lord the king, who hath appointed your meat and your drink: for why should he see your faces worse liking than the children which are of your sort? then shall ye make me endanger my head to the king. Your Faces Worse L1k1ng Hebrew, pinaikcm zoaphim, 'your faces sad.' Zoaphim is rendered by the Lxx. skuthrdpa, 'melancholy-looking'; by the V., macilentiores, 'leaner.' Tht prince of the eunuchs reasoned correctly from a right major premiss--that the best diet will produce the best effect upon the countenance; but his minor premiss being fallacious--that the king's diet was the best--his...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 230 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 417g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236511557
  • 9781236511553