The Teeming Millions of the East; Being a Popular Account of the Inhabitants of Asia the History of Existing and Extinct Nations, Their Ethnology, Manners, and Customs

The Teeming Millions of the East; Being a Popular Account of the Inhabitants of Asia the History of Existing and Extinct Nations, Their Ethnology, Manners, and Customs

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1889 edition. Excerpt: ...of bringing all food to table ready carved. Dress in China is largely made of cotton cloth; but silk is much used by those who can afford it. In winter, furs Dress and cotton wadding are worn for warmth. Indeed, it is singular how little the people employ fires simply to warm themselves; their notion is, to put on more clothes till they are warm enough. Loose trousers, with a loose overgarment reaching below the knees, constitute the most usual dress of the men, finished off with felt-soled cotton shoes, leather being little in vogue. The women's dress, as far as it is seen, often looks like a long cassock surmounted by a mantle extending to the knees. The Chinese have the advantage in dress of unchanging fashions, ceremonial dresses being all ordained by an official board; thus the prevalence of handsome dress for great occasions is accounted for by the care taken of it, Unchanging and the fact that the same may be used again fashions. as 0ng as ft will hold together. Cay fans and umbrellas, as in Japan, are important articles of costume: the art displayed in their manufacture and decoration is very considerable. A few adventurous Chinese have sometimes adopted European costume; but such a change is very hard to make, and it cannot be said that it is altogether to be desired. "We might say that the Chinese women have all the advantage of their handsome hair, while the men get rid of the greater part of it, and indeed are slaves plgtaa to fashion. It is believed that the Manchu Tartars first compelled Chinamen to wear the pigtail, as a mark of inferiority; but what was once a badge cf servitude is now a national pride--a Chinaman would feel disgraced without it. Of course a lot of shaving of the head has to be done to keep the rest of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 90 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236540999
  • 9781236540997