The Teaching of Economics in Harvard University; A Report Presented by the Division of Education at the Request of the Department of Economics

The Teaching of Economics in Harvard University; A Report Presented by the Division of Education at the Request of the Department of Economics

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ...of business and corporate matters by reason of having taken Economics courses. Nine (13 per cent) regarded the courses taken as being a valuable introduction to the field of economics, and 7 (10 per cent) were stimulated to do further private reading and study. Four (7 per cent) spoke of the courses as having "cultural" value. Three (4 per cent) mentioned being better able to understand matters about which they read in newspapers or magazines. Three (4 per cent) had been stimulated to think more thoroughly on all subjects. Three others were able to converse more intelligently on economic subjects. Two felt that they were better able to grasp the work of the law school. One regarded the subject matter as "valueless" but had received some benefit in other ways. Quotations from Lawyers on Values of Courses in Vocation The degree granted from Harvard or other universities is noted in each case. If some special office is held, mention is made of the fact. Numbers refer to courses taken. No. 16. A.B. (magna cum laude) LL.B. A.M. Class of 1891. Economics 1 and two others. Judge of Juvenile Court. I cannot say that any of these courses have been of direct value to me in my vocation or in my social, civic, or economic activities, but I consider all my work under Professor Taussig of great value to me in making up my mind as a voter on economic issues, and in my general understanding of the social order and the essence of wealth, the real function and nature of money, and the relation between capital and labor. No. 56. A.B. A.M. Class of 1891. Economics 1 and 2. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. The chief benefit I got, especially from the study of economic theories, was the mental discipline. I also received some indelible...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 70 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236590511
  • 9781236590510