The Teaching of Arithmetic Volume 2

The Teaching of Arithmetic Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 edition. Excerpt: ...the 0 to it on arrival); then 00 would be affixed to each successive remainder to find each successive new decimal figure beyond the 6th. Doubling the found part of the root. 46. After the first division the doubling of the found part of the root can be performed by doubling the last digit of the previous divisor, or, which is the same thing, by adding to that previous divisor the value denoted by its final figure. For 2x(a + b) = (2a + b) + b. Mentally integrating divisor and dividend. 47. Imagine that we are finding a purely decimal root or else the decimal part of a root. We have found a divisor, entered the proper decimal figure in the root, and completed the division. The figure on this divisor's extreme right and the last found root figure are the same. As the previous part of the divisor = 2 x the previous part of the root, these previous parts have equal decimal places. Therefore the divisor itself and the found part of the root have also equal places, and together they have twice as many places as the found part of the root. This is so even after entering a cipher at the end of a divisor and in the root; but in that case we do not show a separate division with the divisor thus completed, nor does doubling its last digit, which is 0, make any difference to it. It is ready for use as the beginning of the next divisor. Now we have used two decimal figures of the SN for each decimal root figure found, so that in the division under consideration the dividend has twice as many places as the found part of the root, that is, it has as many places as the divisor and the found part of the root together. See, for example, the third division in the sum in 42. The dividend has 6 places; when the division is complete, the divisor and the found...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 64 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 132g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236597125
  • 9781236597120