Teaching Apprentices in the Printing Trades; A Manual for Instructors in Schools of Printing and for Foremen Having Supervision of Apprentices in Printing Plants ...

Teaching Apprentices in the Printing Trades; A Manual for Instructors in Schools of Printing and for Foremen Having Supervision of Apprentices in Printing Plants ...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1922 edition. Excerpt: ...all in a spirit of aiding them to acquire the master touch of craftsmanship. 6. The Illustration Closely akin to the demonstration is the illustration as a teaching device. The chief difference between the two is that the demonstration deals with actual tools, materials, and working conditions, while the illustration uses things that are similar to the real thing. For the illustrative method to be successful, the student must already have had experience with some of the elements of the subject under discussion so that from this experience he can make the mental pictures suggested by the illustration. This method can be used where demonstration is impossible. An instructor may take a class into a room away from the noise and confusion of the shop, and by using pictures, models, diagrams, or exhibits of various materials, can bring out many interesting and valuable points related to the work under way. Examples of this are specimens showing the evolution or manufacture of type matrices or molds, and materials taken from different stages of papermaking or ink manufacture. Very valuable for explaining the operation of intricate machines, such as the linotype or monotype, is the practice of having different sections of these machines mounted, on stands or boards in such manner as disclose working parts that are concealed in the machine when in operation. Wall charts or printed cuts are also useful for this purpose. The danger in the use of illustrative materials lies in the fact that it is often easier to illustrate than to demonstrate, and the instructor who has a tendency to minimum effort is therefore more likely to use it. Remember that for securing actual performance from the student, the demonstration is always preferable. Illustration...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236821769
  • 9781236821768