Tea; A Text Book of Tea Planting and Manufacture with Some Account of the Laws Affecting Labour in Tea Gardens in Assam and Elsewhere

Tea; A Text Book of Tea Planting and Manufacture with Some Account of the Laws Affecting Labour in Tea Gardens in Assam and Elsewhere

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Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1897 edition. Excerpt: ...first "chung" is built one foot or three feet above the ground) there will be three tiers of "chungs" three feet apart from one another. Down the centre, too, there should be a passage ten feet wide, the flooring of it raised a foot or so and sloped off on either side well under the chungs on the right and left; and all this raised part and the slope should be of concrete with a surface of cement, so that on wet days the water and slime brought in on people's feet will run off instead of collecting in pools into which the withered leaf may tumble when being swept up from the chungs. The next two stories (each nine feet in height) also contain three chungs each, for in these cases the leaf can, of course, be spread on the floor of the story. Above the highest of these stories, we come to the space immediately below the sloping roof, and here two or three chungs can very well be arranged running down the middle. The eaves of the house should project very far out, so as in some measure to prevent the rain beating in on to the chungs. So it will be seen that in such a house there will be about eleven full-sized chungs for withering, each capable of containing about thirteen maunds of leaf spread as thinly as it ought to be; therefore we may count on the whole house holding from 140 to 150 maunds of leaf. The tiers of withering-floors, or "chungs," as they are called in Assam, are very light and open in construction, since they are not required to support any great weight; besides which it is of great importance that they should permit the air to penetrate through them and reach the leaf from below. They are therefore usually built on the following plan: --first of all a layer of bamboos is laid on the beams at intervals...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 86 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236627741
  • 9781236627742