Tay-Sachs Disease

Tay-Sachs Disease

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Description

Tay-Sachs disease is a rare, hereditary disease that affects young children, primarily Ashkenazi Jews, French Canadians, and other isolated or self-selecting populations. Caused by the lack of an enzyme that leads to a buildup of fats in nerve and brain cells, it gradually destroys the affected cells, leading to a loss of mental and physical abilities, and, eventually, death. In this fascinating offering, ""Tay-Sachs Disease"" discusses the nature of the disease, why it affects certain groups of people more often than others, how genetic screening can help detect carriers of the Tay-Sachs gene, and what options genetic testing and counseling provide for having children. Student researchers will discover the new medical treatments being used experimentally to treat Tay-Sachs disease, as well as the new genetic treatments that may someday provide a means of curing this degenerative condition.
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Product details

  • Hardback | 128 pages
  • 182.88 x 236.22 x 12.7mm | 453.59g
  • Broomall, United States
  • English
  • full-colour photographs & illustrations, sidebars, references, further reading, web sites, glossary, index
  • 0791096343
  • 9780791096345
  • 1,875,953

About Jeri Freedman

Jeri Freedman has a B.A. from Harvard University and spent 15 years working at companies in the biomedical and high technology fields. She is the author of more than a dozen other nonfiction young adult books and several plays, and, under the name Ellen Foxxe, she is the coauthor of two science fiction novels. Freedman lives in Boston.
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Rating details

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