The Tariff Controversy in the United States 1789-1833; With a Summary of the Period Before the Adoption of the Constitution Volume 1-2

The Tariff Controversy in the United States 1789-1833; With a Summary of the Period Before the Adoption of the Constitution Volume 1-2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ...stockings, silk, and iron, it was only 15 per cent? Why leave glass at a rate of duty which did not equal the foreign bounty? Why make a nominal duty of 25 per cent on cotton eflicient for 83 per cent, and leave a nominal duty on paper of 30 per cent efficient for only 15 per cent or 20 per cent? In introducing the tariff bill of 1824, Tod, chairman of the Committee on Manufactures, declared that no new principle was proposed; nothing but to extend and equalize the system, giving a protection to manufactures equal to that accorded to agriculture. Although it was denied by the Pennsylvania Society that the prohibition of cottons and woolens had ever been intended, it was claimed that total prohibition would cause no monopoly, for any body in the country could engage in manufactures. The United States exchanged raw materials for finished manufacturesthe labor of from two to thirty persons for that of one. The last five years of European peace had taken more from the resources of the people than was acqpirad-in the twenty-two years of European war. Baltimore mer chants and citizens, petitioning for cash duties, declared that foreign credit took the wealth out of the country, and that from the practice and habit of using foreign goods in such abundance an unwarrantable prejudice had been created in their favor, to the great moral injury of the American community, who were disposed to consider many of those articles, not only as matters of convenience and comfort, but also as the test of importance among their fellow citizens. They recommended cash duties also with a-ce of trade and thereby b ' ck a-the recious metals. ' Our extravagance in the importation and consumption of foreign luxuries must be checked, ' was the solemn...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 118 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236964705
  • 9781236964700