Tallis's Illustrated London, in Commemoration of the Great Exhibition of All Nations in 1851, Forming a Complete Guide to the British Metropolis and Its Environs Volume 1

Tallis's Illustrated London, in Commemoration of the Great Exhibition of All Nations in 1851, Forming a Complete Guide to the British Metropolis and Its Environs Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ...the many alterations in the dramatic fashions of which it was the stage. then newly erected, and in 1737 the theatre in Portugalstreet ceased to be a temple of the drama. It was afterwards converted into a Staffordshire pottery warehouse, and was only pulled down about two years back. On the same side of the way, a few yards higher up, is the Insolvent Debtors' Court, built in 1824, after the designs of Sir John Soane. Returning to the eastern side of Drury-lane, and passing some obscure courts, we arrive at Duke-street, a memento of the Duke of York, afterwards James II., opposite Little Russell-street, and the other extremity of which terminates in Lincoln's Inn-fields. In this street is a Roman Catholic chapel, once belonging to the Sardinian embassy, which narrowly escaped destruction during the "NoPopery" riots of 1780; opposite to this chapel lodged Benjamin Franklin when he first visited England in 1725, being then employed as journeyman printer in Great Wyld-street, a street winding from Duke-street into Queenstreet. In Duke-street also lodged the unfortunate Nathaniel Lee. The remaining streets on the east side are Queen-street, which has been noticed at length, and some other streets, the oblivious obscurity of which we need not disturb. Among the former residents of Drury-lane, the celebrated Nell Gwynn, the ancestress of the St. Albans family, ranks conspicuous. That agreeable gossip, Pepys, thus refers to her in his Diary of May 1st, 1667: --" To Westminster, in the way, many milkmaids with garlands upon their pails, dancing with a fiddler before them; and saw pretty Nelly stand at her lodging door in Drury-lane, in her smock sleeves and bodice, looking upon one; she seemed a mighty pretty creature." Re-entering the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 56 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 118g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236875095
  • 9781236875099