The Tabernacle of Israel in the Desert; A Companion Volume to the Portfolio of Plates, Explanatory of the Particulars, with Detailed Plans, Drawings, and Descriptions

The Tabernacle of Israel in the Desert; A Companion Volume to the Portfolio of Plates, Explanatory of the Particulars, with Detailed Plans, Drawings, and Descriptions

By (author) 

List price: US$9.62

Currently unavailable

We can notify you when this item is back in stock

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1888 edition. Excerpt: ... tons. In order to accommodate the number of wagons, the posts might safely be reduced to one-half the diameter that we have supposed for them, which would make their weight comparatively inconsiderablc; and in like manner perhaps the planks, so that they would weigh collectively (if only about an inch thick, greatly stiffened by the metal plates) about 4 tons: but the difilculty of providing carriage, where resources (and especially human and animal force) seem to have been so abundant, is too slight to require a disturbance of our estimates or a stinting of the materials. Where six wagons were volunveered, twenty or more, if necessary, could easily be procured. We may remark that the desert itself supplied this wood in abundance, and the copious store of metals, gems and weaving materials were provided in advance by the divine direction (Exod. iii, 22; xi, 2) to ask (Heb. shoal, the common word for a request. A. V. most unfortunately " borrow," for they never expected or were expected to restore) these things of the Egyptians (a just demand for their long and severe and unrequited labor), and the latter were only glad to bestow in hopes of hastening the departure of thcirlate serfs (Exod. xii, 33-36). These valuables they aftenvards freely contributed, as they were of little use for commercial purposes in the Desert. ln the camp the position of the several tribes was as shown on the following diagram (Num. ii, iv, vii). INNER VAIL. 51 III. The inner room, called the Most Holy Place ("holy of holies," a Hebraism), which we may compare to a shrine, was but a continuation of the front room, the walls, roof-canvas and side-curtains being the same. There are therefore but two objects of special consideration here. (See...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123681892X
  • 9781236818928