A System of Physical Geography; Containing a Description of the Natural Features of the Land and Water, the Phenomena of the Atmosphere, and the Distribution of Vegetable and Animal Life to Which Is Added a Treatise on the Physical

A System of Physical Geography; Containing a Description of the Natural Features of the Land and Water, the Phenomena of the Atmosphere, and the Distribution of Vegetable and Animal Life to Which Is Added a Treatise on the Physical

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1860 edition. Excerpt: ...Europe by this route, the object is to steer south or south-west, according to the prevailing winds, in order as soon as possible to reach the zone of the trade-winds. Once in the region of the trade-winds, the course westward must be shaped in accordance with the position of the port to be attained. 2. From the United States to Europe.--The return to Europe is favored by the Gulf Stream and by the prevailing winds. The average passage for sailing vessels from New York being only 23 days, while that of the opposite voyage is 40. The passage from west to east has been accomplished in 13 days. 3. From New York to San Francisco.--On leaving New York, the ship must sail eastward to about the 60th meridian, before attempting to go south. The reason of this is, that if she were to steer directly from New York to Cape St. Roque, the North-east trades would carry her too far west, on to the northern shores of Brazil, and she would thus be retarded in passing around Cape St. Roque. After reaching the meridian of 60, she takes the North-east trades as soon as possible, and passes Cape St. Rnque at about the meridian of 32. Thence her courso along the coast inside of the Falkland Islands to Cape Horn is quite direct. The passage around Cape Horn is the most difficult part of the voyage, owing to the westerly winds of that quarter, which blow around the Cape in violent puffs and gales. After doubling Cape Horn, the vessel must sail far to the west, in order to enter the region of the South-cast trades at a great distance from the coast, as those winds blow with much greater force nnd regularity far out at sea, than when within the disturbing influences of the land. After crossing the Equator, and getting into the North-east trades, the course is north-west, ..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 88 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 172g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236622421
  • 9781236622426