A System of Anatomical Plates of the Human Body; Accompanied with Descriptions, and Physiological, Pathological & Surgical Observations Volume 1

A System of Anatomical Plates of the Human Body; Accompanied with Descriptions, and Physiological, Pathological & Surgical Observations Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1823 edition. Excerpt: ...thirds of its course, and from the dismemberment of important muscles that would necessarily result, in cutting down to the vessel when wounded, it appears preferable to apply compression to the artery, and to throw a ligature around the superficial femoral artery. VVheu wounded in the distal third of the limb, the patient should be placed on his face, and the toes turned neither tibiad nor fibulad, but distad, to relax the muscles; an incision is then to be made in the centre between the tibial edge of the gastrocnemius muscle, or rather the tendo-achillis r, r, Plate XIX., and the tibial angle q, q of the tibia, through the skin and cellular substance, the second incision cautiously cutting through the fascia, investing the muscles and vessels; the artery will now be distinctly felt pulsating, and should be separated from its concomitant veins and the posterior tibial nerve 22, which generally lies on its fibular side, either with the scalpel, its handle, or the nail of the finger, or the aneurismal needle, the latter of which ought to be introduced from the fibular aspect, between the nerve and artery, leaving out, however, the vena: comites, and brought out at the tibial aspect. Should the surgeon deem it prudent to cut down for the artery in the two proximal thirds of the limb, the position of the patient must be the same, but the measurement must he between the same angle where the artery divides into the internal or tibial plantar c, and the external or fibular plantar a branches, both of which are observed to run beneath the abductor pollicis muscle B; theinternal c proceeding along its fibular margin, and dividing into several small branches, which extend to the great toe, the index, and the flexor brevis cligitorum c, supplying...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 166 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 308g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236920643
  • 9781236920645