A Synopsis of [J.] Butler's Analogy of Religion, Natural and Revealed, to the Constitution and Course of Nature, with Biographical Sketch and Examination Questions

A Synopsis of [J.] Butler's Analogy of Religion, Natural and Revealed, to the Constitution and Course of Nature, with Biographical Sketch and Examination Questions

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1881 edition. Excerpt: ...has placed us in here, and made known to us. If mankind are morally depraved, and, so are unfit for the state which Christ is gone to prepare for His disciples;, and if the assistance of the Spirit be necessary to renew their nature, is it possible any can think. it a slight matter whether or no he makes use of the means expressly commanded by God for obtaining this Divine assistance? since the whole analogy of nature shows that we are not to expect any benefits without using the appointed means for obtaining them. Now, reason shpws, nothing of the immediate means of obtaining temporal or spiritual benefits-We must learn this, either from experience or revelation, The present case does not admit of the former. The conclusion from all this is, that Christianity being supposed true or credible, it is unspeakable irreverence and rashness to treat it lightly. The following deductions may be added to illustrate the foregoing observations, and to prevent mistakes, (1) We may clearly see the distinction between the positive and the moral in religion. Moral precepts are precepts the reasons of which we see; positive precepts are precepts the reasons of which we do not see. Moral duties arise from the nature of the case itself, prior to external command; positive duties do not arise from the nature of the case, but from external command. But the manner in which the fact of the relation or the nature of the case is made known, does not denominate any duty, positive or moral. That we be baptized in the name of the Father, is as much a positive duty as that we be in the name of the Son, for both arise from revealed command; though our relation to the Father is made known by reason, our relation to the Son by revelation only. Again, gratitude as...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 38 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 86g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123696439X
  • 9781236964397