The Sword That Cut the Burning Grass

The Sword That Cut the Burning Grass

4.08 (280 ratings by Goodreads)
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Description

When fourteen-year-old samurai apprentice Seikei is sent on a mission by the shogun, he believes it to be a simple one: convince the fourteen-year-old emperor to resume his ceremonial duties. But then the emperor is kidnapped, and Seikei finds himself in the middle of an elaborate plot to overthrow the shogun. With the help of a mysterious warrior, he must rescue the emperor before the sacred sword said to be unbeatable in battle falls into the wrong hands. Seikei knows he must succeed, or bloodshed will stain the land."
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Product details

  • Paperback | 211 pages
  • 127 x 165.1 x 17.8mm | 45.36g
  • New York, NY, United States
  • English
  • Reprint
  • 0142406899
  • 9780142406892
  • 907,554

About Dorothy Hoobler

Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler are historians and authors of over sixty books, both fiction and nonfiction, mostly for young readers. They are the authors of the well-loved American Family Album series, including "The Japanese American Family Album," which was named a Carter G. Woodson Honor Book in 1997.The Society for School Librarians International chose their book "Showa: The Era of Hirohito" for a best book award in 1991, and they have been cited for excellence by the Library of Congress, the Parents' Choice Foundation, Bank Street College, the International Reading Association, the National Conference of Christians and Jews, and the New York Public Library. The Hooblers make their home in New York City. They have one daughter and are active in community affairs.copyright (c) 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.
Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler are historians and authors of over sixty books, both fiction and nonfiction, mostly for young readers. They are the authors of the well-loved American Family Album series, including "The Japanese American Family Album," which was named a Carter G. Woodson Honor Book in 1997.The Society for School Librarians International chose their book "Showa: The Era of Hirohito" for a best book award in 1991, and they have been cited for excellence by the Library of Congress, the Parents' Choice Foundation, Bank Street College, the International Reading Association, the National Conference of Christians and Jews, and the New York Public Library. The Hooblers make their home in New York City. They have one daughter and are active in community affairs.copyright (c) 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.
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Rating details

280 ratings
4.08 out of 5 stars
5 38% (106)
4 39% (109)
3 19% (54)
2 2% (6)
1 2% (5)

Our customer reviews

Synopsis: During the period of Yoshimune, the 8th shogun of the Tokugawa family, Judge Ooka was well respected for his wise and honest decisions and regarded as the Sherlock Holmes of Japan. Seikei was born to a merchant family, but had won the Judge\'s respect when he voluntarily assisted him solve a case and prevent serious injustice. Judge Ooka adopted Seikei and is fulfilling Seikei\'s dream to become a samurai. Now fourteen year old samurai apprentice Seikei is called upon to assist his adoptive father, Judge Ooaki, serve the Shogun. The emperor of Japan is a young boy and has refused to perform his duties. The Shogun sends Seikei to Kyoto convince the emperor to leave the temple and to resume his duties. The Shogun explains that the emperor must make a public appearance at the time of the spring solstice, plow a furrow of land and sow rice seeds to maintain the peace. If the emperor fails to perform this duty, the farmers will fear for the harvest and will be unable to deliver the proper quotas to their daimyo lords, and this will result in widespread unrest. Seikei must convince the emperor to resume his duties. Seikei meets with the emperor, but soon after he leaves the temple, sudden violence erupts. The emperor is suddenly missing and Seikei is arrested. To save himself and to serve his country, young Seikei must track down the emperor\'s whereabouts and prevent a daimyo\'s grab for control with the help a mysterious samurai and a young serving girl. Meanwhile, Judge Ooaki is unaware of the dangers that track his young charge. Review: I enjoy historical fiction and detective novels. Japan during the 1700s, the time of the powerful Shoguns, holds particular fascination for me. Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler\'s series are made even more enjoyable by their choice of lead characters. Judge Ooka is a historical figure with a reputation for wise and honest decisions and has been described as the Sherlock Holmes of Japan. He served the 8th shogun of the Tokugawa family. In his official capacity, Judge Ooka is assigned to solve crimes and to help the Shogun maintain the peace. Judge Ooka is assisted by his adoptive son, the young Seikei. The point of view of Judge Ooka\'s adoptive son, Seikei works particularly well. Born as a merchant\'s son, Seikei wants to become worthy of his new samurai status. Seikei has a strong sense of honor and considerable courage but is still developing his samurai skills. When asked which do he values more, life or honor? \"Honor,\" replies Seikei dutifully, \"because everyone must die, but honor lasts forever.\" Since a fourteen year old boy can blend in and observe a great deal, Seikei undertakes critical missions much more than an easily recognized official of the Shogun. Stout of heart and determined, Seikei serves his father, the Shogun and the Emperor well. This particular installment is one of the more captivating of the series because of the friendships and adventures that Seikei makes along the way.show more
by Gaby @ Starting Fresh
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