The Supporting Strength of Sewer Pipe in Ditches; And Methods of Testing Sewer Pipe in Laboratories to Determine Their Ordinary Supporting Strength

The Supporting Strength of Sewer Pipe in Ditches; And Methods of Testing Sewer Pipe in Laboratories to Determine Their Ordinary Supporting Strength

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ...in one field and in explaining the general proposition of the relative efficiencies of different underdrainage systems. Effect of Depth of Laterals: The discussions just given will explain the relationship between the depth of laterals and the rate of movement of the surplus soil water. Few, if any, underdrainage systems are so designed and constructed thftt the plane of saturation will not rise to the surface during or after heavy rains. It is apparent then, that if the soil is uniform, that placing the laterals deeper will cause an increase in the rate of movement of surplus moisture as will a decrease in the distance between laterals. However, other considerations control the depth of laterals to within such close limits that this relationship is of less importance than that of the spacing in laterals. In considering the effect of placing the laterals at a greater depth the effect of the variation in the soil at different depths must be considered. For example, if the subsoil is a very close clay, the movement of groundwater though this stratum will be much slower than through the more open top soil. This increase in the resistance to the flow may be sufficient to more than counterbalance the increase due to the steeper hydraulic grade. In some soils, such as were referred to above, drains only two feet deep may appear to be just as effective, or in extreme cases, more effective, than drains four feet deep. A greater depth than this is desirable in order to increase the depth of soil that is in condition to furnish plant food. This close subsoil usually contains valuable plant food which must be made available if the field is to produce the maximum crops. The close soils become more open and drain more readily after the drains have...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 100 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 195g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236751213
  • 9781236751218