Supplemental Report of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, in Two Volumes; Supplemental to Senate Report No. 142, 38th Congress, 2D Session Volume 2

Supplemental Report of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, in Two Volumes; Supplemental to Senate Report No. 142, 38th Congress, 2D Session Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1866 edition. Excerpt: ...of many years. ' It will doubtless be remembered by the War Department, that, shortly after my arrival in Minnesota, in October. 1862, to assume command of this department, I invited the attention of the Secretary of War to this subject, in relation to its application to the reserve and annuity Indians concerned in the outbreak in that State. I proposed then that all the annuity Sioux, as well as the Winnebagoes, be collected together, with or without their consent, and removed to some point for in'the rear of the frontier settlements; that their arms be taken away from them; that the payment of money annuities be stopped; that the appropriations for that purpose, and to pay for all lands claimed by such Indians, be devoted to building them villages and supplying them with food and clothing. By this means the annuity Indian would be deprived of any power to indulge his wandering habits, or to injure his white or other neighbors. The temptation which the payment of money to him constantly presents to unscrupulous whites would be taken away, and he would thus be shielded from all the corrupt' and debasing influences which have surrounded him in times past. He would be placed under the most favorable circumstances to apply to him the influences of civilization, education, and Christianity, with hope of successful results, and without the surroundings which have hitherto made such instruction impracticable. In the second, if not in the first generation, such humanizing influences would have their full effect, and the Indian, if he could not be made a good citizen, could at least be made a harmless member of any community in which his lot might be cast.. So long as annuity Indians retain their tribal 'organization, and are treated...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 212 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 386g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123677115X
  • 9781236771155