The Sunday-School World Volume 39, No. 10

The Sunday-School World Volume 39, No. 10

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1899 edition. Excerpt: ... purple and the king's horse were a combination of magnificence and splendor rare even in Oriental courts. They were reputed in the court of Xerxes to be worth ten thousand talents, or several millions of dollars. Ker Porter describes the royal dress of the shah of Persia as one blaze of jewels, which literally dazzled the eyes. He had a triplepointed tiara on his head, that was covered with diamonds, pearls, rubies and emeralds, so arranged that they reflected a splendid play of colors. Great black plumes of the heron, tipped with pearls and put in rows of jewels, surmounted the apparel or robe, which was of cloth of gold, covered also with precious stones and pearls, and a great string of pearls, perhaps the largest in the world, thrown around his neck. Something like this was Mordecai arrayed, mounted on the king's horse splendidly caparisoned and led through the streets by Haman. The banquet came, but not Haman; so he was sent for. Then Esther presented her cause and that of her people, accusing Haman of the plot to his face before the king. The king was in wrath; he had been caught in the trap with Haman. The latter begged the queen for his life; but the king visited summary punishment by hanging Haman on the gallows prepared for Mordecai. Then, as he could not reverse the decree, he thwarted it by issuing a second, authorizing the Jews to arm and defend themselves from the attack, which they did. In commemoration of this deliverance the Jews established the feast of Purim. SPECIAL WORD STUDIES. Besought. The Hebrew is stronger: "she wept and besought him." Mischief Of Haman. The king had really given the decree. The queen, with womanly tact, suggests that it was Haman's act, not the king's; so she avoided asking the king...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236740297
  • 9781236740298