Suggestions for Primary and Intermediate Lessons on the Human Body; A Study of Its Structure and Needs Correlated with Nature Study

Suggestions for Primary and Intermediate Lessons on the Human Body; A Study of Its Structure and Needs Correlated with Nature Study

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1898 edition. Excerpt: ...limewater into the jar and observe the effect. Sum up all that has been observed in regard to this gas and name it carbonic-acid gas or carbon dioxide. Tell the pupils where the carbon came from; the oxygen. Breathe through a glass tube into some limewater. Observe the effect upon the limewater. Make an inference in regard to the presence of carbonic-acid gas in the air exhaled. Find out what becomes of the carbonic-acid gas given off into the air by our breathing and from our fires and lights. Tell the pupils that plants breathe with all their parts, taking in oxygen and throwing off carbonic-acid gas the same as man; that when the sun shines plants, by means of their green parts, take from carbonic-acid gas carbon, which is used as food. Consider whether carbonic-acid gas is poisonous or not; why it is bad to have too much of it in the air; what its presence indicates in a room where there are many people. Watery Vapor.--(See Vaporous Form of Water, Chap. on Water.) Combustion. Necessary Conditions.--Place a lamp-chimney over a lighted candle. Cover the top of the chimney. Uncover the top and do not allow air to enter at the bottom. Allow air to enter at both top and bottom. Make an inference in regard to the conditions necessary for combustion--the need of air, the inlet and the outlet. Refer to the experiments in oxygen, nitrogen, and carbonic-acid gas, and name the element necessary for combustion. Study the draughts of stoves, the necessity of air, how its inlet and outlet are provided for. Products.--Hold a lighted splinter or taper over burning charcoal, kerosene, or alcohol. Explain why it is extinguished. Collect some of the gas formed by combustion. Shake it in limewater and observe the effect. Place a cold chimney on a lighted...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 104g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236645987
  • 9781236645982