The Suburban Horticulturist; Or, an Attempt to Teach the Science and Practice of the Culture and Management of the Kitchen, Fruit, & Forcing Garden to Those Who Have Had No Previous Knowledge or Practice in These Departments of Gardening

The Suburban Horticulturist; Or, an Attempt to Teach the Science and Practice of the Culture and Management of the Kitchen, Fruit, & Forcing Garden to Those Who Have Had No Previous Knowledge or Practice in These Departments of Gardening

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1842 edition. Excerpt: ...affixed to the old branch, as in Conical training, with the summer thoott tied down. Fig.SM. Hazard-. fi8-283' mrkin8 the. 'oung 80001 whkh quenouille train-tied down. Trained in this manner, whenever it may be ing, first stage, found necessary to cut out the old branches, these, by a half-twist, may be brought down without danger of breaking, and the bend will be less abrupt and unsightly. By the same rules, trees may be trained in the same manner, with two or more tiers, as in fig. 284. The success of this mode of training depends upon due attention being paid to the disbudding or rubbing off useless shoots in the spring, and taking due care of those which are intended either to carry on and extend the tree, or to succeed and occupy the place of the old bearers. It will," he concludes, "be found extremely well adapted to apple-trees on paradise-stocks, peartrees on quince-stocks, cherry-trees, &c.; and also to peach-trees in pots; and it is Fig. m nayvard'ia most economical mode, as it requires no quenouiiutraining, stakes."--(Gard. May. vol. vii. p. 441.) 800. Fan-training is chiefly adapted for trees trained against walls, and more especially for the peach and apricot. There are several modifications of the fan form, and five different varieties may bo pointed out. The first is the equal fan, in which there are a number of main branches all radiating from the Fig. 2M. /fajmnr graft of the tree; in the case of dwarfs, all the branches 't'TM"'n auenaui"' radiate from the horizontal line upwards, but in the case of standards against walls, or what in Scotland are called riders, they radiate downwards as well as upwards; and this forms the second, or what is called the stellate-fan manner of training. The third mode...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 422 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 22mm | 748g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236495381
  • 9781236495389