A Study of the Radiation of the Atmosphere; Based Upon Observations of the Nocturnal Radiation During Expeditions to Algeria and to California

A Study of the Radiation of the Atmosphere; Based Upon Observations of the Nocturnal Radiation During Expeditions to Algeria and to California

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1915 edition. Excerpt: ...fl2_ I2 _m'2+n The results of these measurements for various conditions are given in table IX. Four series, representing different conditions in regard to the prevailing humidity, were taken at Bassour, Algeria, at a height of 1,160 m. above sea level. Two series were taken on Introducing this in (1) and integrating between the limits 0 and m, we obtain for the radiation to the whole strip: My instrument contained two radiating strips: For the one was: m = g.o; n = 2.0. For the other one: m = 9.0 and n = 6.0. Further I had: R = 68.3; p = 19.6. As my unit of radiation, I will now define the radiation from a surface equal to the surface of the strips within a solid angle whose cross-section is a square, and each side of which subtends one degree. Introducing the given values of a, m, n and R in (2), I then find that the mean radiation from the two strips is 768.6 times my unit of radiation. top of Mount Whitney, 4,420 m. above sea level. In every instance the sky was perfectly clear and appeared perfectly uniform. It will be shown later on, that there is also strong experimental evidence for the perfect uniformity of the sky. In order to obtain from the observations a more detailed idea of the effective radiation to different parts of the sky, I proceeded in the following way: In a system of coordinates, where the zenith angle is plotted along the.ar-axis, the magnitude of the radiation along the y-axis, every measurement with the instrument corresponds to an integral extending over 320 and limited.by the-axis and a certain curve--the distribution curve of radiation. If the measurements are plotted as rectangular surfaces, whose widths are 32 and whose heights are proportional to the magnitude of the radiation, we obtain from the observations a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236631358
  • 9781236631350