A Study of the Action of Ammonia on Thymol

A Study of the Action of Ammonia on Thymol : Dissertation; Submitted in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Faculty of Pure Science of Columbia University (Classic Reprint)

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Excerpt from A Study of the Action of Ammonia on Thymol: Dissertation; Submitted in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Faculty of Pure Science of Columbia University
In the course of experiments on enzymes as possible factors in the development of edema Prof. Gies, greatly to his surprise, found that trypsin in ammonium hydroxide solution containing sodium chloride, failed to give the swelling results with elastin which had previously been observed under similar conditions; instead of swelling, the elastin particles gradually became green and then blue (1). It was then recalled that the elastin used had been prepared some years before, and had been preserved with a solution of thymol in alcohol. That the blue color was due to thymol was confirmed by mixing some thymol with ten percent, ammonium hydroxide solution and obtaining the color on standing. Alcohol appeared to accelerate the transformation. By evaporating the ether extract (which was red), a purplish red oily product, soluble in ether, toluene, and alcohol, was obtained. On another occasion the oily product became crystalline.
One of the most interesting observations was that "the red alcoholic solution was turned deeply bluish by a drop of N/10 sodium hydroxide solution, the red being restored by a drop of N/10 hydrochloric acid solution." This color reaction would clearly indicate its use as an indicator.
These observations naturally suggested further inquiry. What was the nature of the blue pigment obtained by the action of ammonia upon thymol? How would it behave when substituted for thymol in the important uses to which the latter is put? How would other phenols behave when treated with ammonia, and how would the thymol pigment, and the other phenol derivatives compare chemically and pharmacologically?
It was with this broad object in view that the present investigation was undertaken.
Here the more purely chemical side of the problem has been dealt with, for within the given time little more could be done; but pharmacological studies have already been begun, and investigation of various other aspects of the subjects are under way.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 78 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 4mm | 118g
  • Forgotten Books
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 133220144X
  • 9781332201440