Studies in English Prose, Consisting of Specimens of the Language in Its Earliest, Succeeding, and Latest Stages; With Notes Explanatory and Critical, and a Sketch of the History of the English Language and a Concise Anglo-Saxon Grammar.

Studies in English Prose, Consisting of Specimens of the Language in Its Earliest, Succeeding, and Latest Stages; With Notes Explanatory and Critical, and a Sketch of the History of the English Language and a Concise Anglo-Saxon Grammar.

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1881 edition. Excerpt: ...WAS CROMWELL A TYRANT? (FROM THE SAME WORK.) I CALL him (said I) a tyrant' who either intrudes himself forcibly into the government of his fellow-citizens without any legal authority over them, or who, having a just title to the government of a people, abuses it to the destruction or tormenting of them. So that all tyrants are at the same time usurpers, either of the whole, or at least of a part of that power which they assume to themselves; and no less are they to be accounted rebels, since no man can usurp authority over others but by rebelling against them who had it before, or at least against those laws which were his superiors; and in all these senses no history can afford us a more evident example of tyrann, or more out of all possibility of excuse or palliation, than t at of the person whom you are pleased to defend; (ll Tyr/mt. This word (fr. Gr. 'nipa.vvo9) was first applied to the man who, in afree republic. had got the supreme power imo his own hands. This was what Pisistratus did at Athens. and hence he was called a tyrant, though it was allowed that he administered the power, which he had forcibly seized, ably and justly. The very different use made hy others of power gained Ly similar means, has darkened the meaning of this neutral word. The various ordinary senses it the word are admirably illustrated in the text, and some introduced which are questionable whether we consider his reiterated rebellions against all his superiors, or his usurpation of the supreme power to himself, or his tyranny in the exercise of it; and if lawful princes have been esteemed tyrants by not containing themselves within the bounds of those laws which have been left them as the sphere (limit) of their authority by their forefathers, what...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 182 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 336g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236777468
  • 9781236777461