Students and the Missionary Problem; Addresses Delivered at the International Student Missionary Conference, London, January 2-6, 1900

Students and the Missionary Problem; Addresses Delivered at the International Student Missionary Conference, London, January 2-6, 1900

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ... railways. Taken as a whole the Dark Continent is still an unevangelised mass with a broken fringe of light around its edge, and a few threads and streaks radiating inwards. Submitted to a closer survey the gaps and blanks become more apparent. The 56 Protestant missionary agencies, and 22 Roman orders or missions which are in thetfield may still find plenty of room, if they will, without treading on each other's heels. I content myself with referring only to a few of the areas where work is being done. Starting from the north, and going westward, southward, and then round by the east to the part from which I began, I note that along the whole of the Red Sea littoral there is now no Protestant Mission, but only'a small Roman station at Suakim. Lower Egypt has drawn a considerable body of various missions, but Upper-Egypt, so long closed, is only now about to be penetrated by one Protestant Society, the Church Missionary Society, and to be re-occupied by the Austrian priests who had been driven out of Khartoum. A vast region of heathen tribes, such as Dinkas, Shilluks and Gallas, together with the Mohammedan districts, such as Kordofan, are still absolutely untouched. Along the northern coast the North Africa Mission is working in most of the important towns. The Wesleyans, Scotch United Presbyterians, and French Protestants have each one station; the Roman Missions are in strong force and are the only people who have entered the Sahara. Turning the corner of the Continent, I note that from the Senegal River to the Niger nearly all Christian Missions hug the coast. "European and American, Roman and Protestant with the exception of the Basel Mission in Ashantiland, a Roman Mission in Dahomey, and several Protestant stations in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 214 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 390g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236809459
  • 9781236809452