The Student's Manual; Designed, by Specific Directions, to Aid in Forming and Strengthening the Intellectual and Moral Character and Habits of the Student

The Student's Manual; Designed, by Specific Directions, to Aid in Forming and Strengthening the Intellectual and Moral Character and Habits of the Student

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1835 edition. Excerpt: ...You are perfectly aware that you have used the best and most appropriate means in your power, when you have exhausted your powers of persuasion in conversation. If you cannot reach his heart and conscience in this way, you despair of doing it. If you wish for information on a particular subject, and there is a book which has it all drawn out on paper, and there is a friend who perfectly understands it, why do you go to that friend and hear him converse, rather than to the book? Because you know that the latter method is not the most interesting and easy way of obtaining information. You can ask light on particular points; you can state your objections; you can compare with what you already know; you can soon know all that your informer knows. Varilles has said that, "Of ten things which he knew, he had learned nine from conversation.' Make it a matter of study, then, to understand this subject, and not merely try to free yourself from faults, but to make it an accomplishment, --a part of your Floating thoughts. City inhabitants. education. There is scarcely any way by which you can gain a stronger hold upon the circles in which you may move, or in which you may do more good. In conversation all are free-booters, and may carry away and appropriate to themselves as much as they can; and there is a vast quantity of thought and information afloat upon the great mass of intelligent mind, which never has been, and never will be, committed to paper. He who is permitted to draw from this great fountain, can hardly fail of having thought poured upon him sufficient to render him intelligent, even though he should never open a book. You will see this every day in our cities. There the mass of men are too busy and hurried to read. They do not read; and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 94 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236645030
  • 9781236645036