The Structure of Music; An Elementary Text-Book on Notation and Harmony, with Full Illustrations and Abundant Exercises for Use in the Class-Room, and for Self-Instruction

The Structure of Music; An Elementary Text-Book on Notation and Harmony, with Full Illustrations and Abundant Exercises for Use in the Class-Room, and for Self-Instruction

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ... above are dissonant. Dissonant 6 chords have special treatments, and the specific rules of guidance in their choice and use will be presented under the special problems of composition which call for them. 7 In general it may be said that all rules of tonality given later are but applications of the laws already stated. USE OF CONSONANT CHORDS. Preliminary Statements. Part-writing. 8 The ability to use chords in the more natural and simple ways which should first be learned, can be most easily attained by undertaking to write music suitable to be sung by a quartette of human voices; since the limited range of the voices will keep the chord-notes within easily recognizable intervals with one another, while the simplest of melodies are always satisfactory in writing for the human voice. g The range of the four voices may be fixed for practical purposes as follows: Doubling of Tones. 10 Triads, when written in four parts, must have one of their 11 tones doubled, at unison or octave. The requirements of melody 12 usually indicate which tone that shall be. But when there is a choice, the law of balance of sound found in the Harmonic Chord determines that, in major chords at least, the root should be most prominent, the fifth next, the third least. Omission of Tones. 1 Somewhat rarely the melodic requirements are met better by 2 omitting a tone from a triad. This necessitates, in four-part harmony, the doubling of both the remaining tones, or, often, 3 the tripling of one, which should be the root. There is but one chord-note, in any chord, that supplies itself so readily in thought as to be omitted without at all injuring the clear statement of the chord, --namely, the perfect fifth. Terms of Melodic Motion. 4 The terms contrary motion, oblique motion, .show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236560914
  • 9781236560919