Structure and Functions of the Body; A Hand-Book of Anatomy and Physiology for Nurses and Others Desiring a Practical Knowledge of the Subject

Structure and Functions of the Body; A Hand-Book of Anatomy and Physiology for Nurses and Others Desiring a Practical Knowledge of the Subject

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1911 edition. Excerpt: ...flow through the other arteries. The palor of fright is due to the action of the vasoconstrictor nerves of the face and blushing to the action of the vasodilators. Heat stimulates the vasodilators so that more blood goes to the skin, perspiration begins, and the body is cooled by evaporation. Cold stimulates the vasoconstrictors and the blood is kept within the body, where it cannot cool. If a part has too much blood, an impulse passes by the vasoconstrictors to lessen the supply, while if more blood is needed a message goes to the central nervous system and an impulse passes by the vasodilators to flush the organ. The more active a part is in functioning the greater the number of capillaries, except in the brain, which has only large vessels. The vessels of the intestines contain much blood and are capable of containing all the blood in the body. The Blood.--The blood itself, which thus circulates through the body, carrying nutrition to the tissues and removing waste, is a complex fluid of a bright red color. Its amount has been calculated to be about one-thirteenth of the body weight. One-fourth of it is generally in the heart, lungs, and large arteries and veins, one-fourth in the liver, one-fourth in the skeletal muscles, and one-fourth variously distributed through the other organs. If there is too little blood, the vital processes cannot go on as they should, while too great a supply causes weakness rather than strength. So the tendency is to keep the amount constant and any blood added is disposed of and any blood lost is replaced. In starvation it is the last tissue to be used up, for on it the life of the other tissues depends. Composition.--In composition the blood is practically the same in all arteries and fundamentally the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 66 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 136g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236793110
  • 9781236793119