Street Railway Fares, Their Relation to Length of Haul and Cost of Service; Report of Investigation Carried on in the Research Division of the Electrical Engineering Department of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Street Railway Fares, Their Relation to Length of Haul and Cost of Service; Report of Investigation Carried on in the Research Division of the Electrical Engineering Department of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ... fare, but also has a ticket system, giving a rate of approximately 4 cts. per ride. In these comparative statistics, the Cleveland report for the year 1914 is used, as this was most nearly comparable statistically with the data available for the other cities. Brief History of 3-ct. Fare Situation in Cleveland.--In order to understand the present situation in Cleveland, it is necessary to know something of the events which led up to the formulation of the unusual city ordinance under which the Cleveland Railway is now operating in cooperation with the city. The story of the 10 years of bitter conflict between the city, as represented by Mayor Tom L. Johnson, and the railway interests is a remarkable one, which deserves the careful study of anyone interested in the relations of street railways with the public. It can only be briefly outlined in this paper. Trouble between the public and the street railway companies in Cleveland had developed, even before Johnson's first election to the mayor's office in 1901, so that he was able to make a powerful campaign issue of the railway question. "Three-cent Fares" as a plank in any politician's platform was bound to be a popular one, and it must be remembered that Johnson, himself, before beginning his political career, had been in the street railway business in several cities, from the bottom to the top. Consequently, an intimate knowledge of the business gave him a great advantage over an ordinary type of political agitator. Although in the heat of conflict, and for the sake of political expediency, Mayor Johnson may have said and done things which at times seemed unfair and unreasonable, there can be little doubt that he was sincere in his belief that his ultimate object was right. Public...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 52 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236504348
  • 9781236504340