Stray Leaves from the Diary of an Indian Officer; Containing an Account of the Famous Temple of Juggurnath, Its Daily Ceremonies and Annual Festivals and a Residence in Australia

Stray Leaves from the Diary of an Indian Officer; Containing an Account of the Famous Temple of Juggurnath, Its Daily Ceremonies and Annual Festivals and a Residence in Australia

By (author) 

List price: US$19.99

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1865 edition. Excerpt: ...world was wide enough for him and us too," as Sterne said to the Hy that he rescued from drowning; but the buzz of a fly and the rip-up of a pig are very different things, and I question if Master Lawrence, in our situation, would have carried his sentimentality so far as to spare the pig. Any how, we made the best of it, and ate piggy. CHAPTER XVI. Wild Tribes of Khunds and Sows--Information procured from them--Khond Paiks at A rang--Meriahs--Thugs--Remains of Victims discovered near Pooree--Conviction of the Thugs--Letter of a Convict to his Wife--Customs of the Thugs--Confessions of a Thug--The Thugs never shed Blood--Their Way of doing Business--Only one Instance known of their attacking an European. A Short time after my trip to Sumbhulpore, I wished to ascertain something more about the wild and savage tribes of Khunds and Sours living amongst the hills and jungles of Khoordah, and also on the northern and western boundaries of the district Accordingly, I crossed the Chilka Lake, and proceeded to Banpore, a large village containing two thousand inhabitants, situated about six miles from the lake. Here I pitched my tents. A few miles to the west of Banpore, and just within the boundaries of the Bengal Presidency, there is a district called Burra Mall It is about six miles in extent, and peopled by some hundred and fifty Khund families. In ordinary times these Burra Mall Khunds are tolerably quiet, as there is a strict watch kept over them by a chief called a Bissooee. The Bissooee is not a Khund, but an Ooriah of the Maentee caste, and is responsible for the good behaviour of the people. This man paid me a visit, and I requested him to bring some of his proteges to my camp Accordingly, about a score of them came, bearing little presents...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 88 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 172g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236494636
  • 9781236494634