Stories and Facts of Alaska; A Wonderful Book of Fascinating and Surprising Information of Alaska's Vast Resources; A Travelers Guide to the Gold Mines, the Farming Valleys, the Coal and Oil Fields, and the Different Routes to Alaska,

Stories and Facts of Alaska; A Wonderful Book of Fascinating and Surprising Information of Alaska's Vast Resources; A Travelers Guide to the Gold Mines, the Farming Valleys, the Coal and Oil Fields, and the Different Routes to Alaska,

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1921 edition. Excerpt: ...can be brought in from the coal mines and supplies of all kinds for the interior. I Poultry Raising in Alaska URING the cold winter the chickens are D kept warm with a fire in the henhouse and an electric light for them to see to eat, as the days are so short. To buy feed, the price is, wheat, $10 a hundred; oats, $9 a hundred; scratch feed, $9; oyster shells, 10 cents per pound; eggs sell for $1.50 to $2 per dozen. Young chickens just hatched are 50 cents each, hens $5 each, fryers $1.25 per pound, old hens $1 per pound dressed. Sometimes the chickens are kept in a basement where there is a furnace to heat the cabin and they have an electric light to see to eat through the long night of twenty hours. In summer they can go to roost any time, as it does not get dark at all. They can lay eggs any time they want to or sit if they wish. And sometimes we see an account in the newspaper like this: "Chickens roasted in fire. Forty chickens were burned to death at an early hour this morning when the frame building in which they were housed was destroyed by fire. The fire is supposed to have been caused by the stove getting over-heated during the night." Mr. Vining came in on the first boat from the outside with a great number of poultry. Last spring he came in with about 25 crates of chickens, two dozen in a crate. He had white and brown Leghorns, Plymouth Rocks, Orpingtons and other kinds. He got $5 each for the chickens, nine geese sold for $100, and turkeys sold for $15 each. He sold over $3,000 worth. Quite a number of townspeople buy a dozen or more hens from Mr. Vining in spring, keep them through the summer for the eggs and to raise young chickens for fries. Then when it gets cold in fall they kill and freeze them, and they...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 64 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 132g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236948912
  • 9781236948915