The Stonemason and the Bricklayer; Being Practical Details and Drawings Illustrating the Various Departments of the Industrial Arts of Masonry and Bri

The Stonemason and the Bricklayer; Being Practical Details and Drawings Illustrating the Various Departments of the Industrial Arts of Masonry and Bri

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Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 edition. Excerpt: ...uniform the mixture, the finer the texture, the better the quality; when there is a greater percentage of one of the constituents the quality is in proportion lower in value. When the predominating constituent is feldspar the quality is the lowest in value, as this is more liable to decay than the mica. The mean weight of granite per cubic foot is 16625 lb., the specific gravity 2'66, water being unity. Although one should not calculate that it was so, judging from the hard, close texture of the stone, still granite readily absorbs water, having a comparatively high degreo of porosity. The percentage--mean--of water which granite contains may be taken as 0'8; or a cubic yard holds three and a half gallons, to which a third more may be added by long exposure to wet. There are other stones classed, at least named, by many as granites--such, for example, as the stones found near the town of Leicester, which are of the crystalline class, of much the same character as syenite, having hornblende as a marked constituent. This is the case with the variety known as the Mountsorrel, of which there are two kinds--the red and the grey. The Leicestershire granites are, however, more used for paving and for the making of road metal, their value for these purposes arising from a peculiar toughness which they possess, in consequence of the peculiar way in which the crystalline constituents are aggregated. The stone known as "serpentine," and so valued from the beautifully variegated colours it displays, and from the ease with which it may be worked, belongs to, or is classed with, the granitic rocks. It is a " hydrated silicate of magnesia," and is capable, like granite, of taking on a high polish; and although from this circumstance it...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 82 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 163g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236562313
  • 9781236562319