Stock Keeping for Amateurs

Stock Keeping for Amateurs

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1880 edition. Excerpt: ...that small Irish farmers desire to add to their gains by bringing up a few horses annually, which many manage to do at a small cost, and by following economical methods of feeding. Rearing Foals. As to the desirability of rearing foals on a farm, Mr. Hooper, in a paper read before the Ballineen Farmers' Club, says: "The farmer may not have all the appliances and arrangements of a stud farm, with its paddock, open yards, loose boxes, &c; stilL he may like to rear a foal or two every year, and, without entering deeply into the question whether it pays to breed farm horses, I think most will agree with me that it is better for a farmer to have horses to sell than horses to buy. Moreover, few farmers can afford to give up the whole time of their brood mares to breeding, nor do I see any reason why they should. Neither the mare nor the foal she is carrying will be any the worse for her regular work on the farm, provided she is well fed and not put to extra hard work, nor to work to which she has been unaccustomed. Of course, the nearer the mare gets to her time of foaling the lighter must be the work required of her, and a week or two before the time she should be left perfectly idle, especially if not in high condition. If the mare foals very early in the season, and the weather is bad, she and the foal should be put in a loose box at night, and allowed as much liberty by day as the weather will permit; but if she does not foal before the month of April, she may be kept in a sheltered field day and night, and, unless the pasture is very good, a feed of oats should be given her every morning. Now, we all know that the foal would be better if his dam had nothing to do but to suckle him until he is old enough to wean; but I am speaking...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 70 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236780523
  • 9781236780522