Steam Warfare in the Parana; A Narrative of Operations, by the Combined Squadrons of England and France, in Forcing a Passage Up That River Volume N .

Steam Warfare in the Parana; A Narrative of Operations, by the Combined Squadrons of England and France, in Forcing a Passage Up That River Volume N .

List price: US$14.14

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1848 edition. Excerpt: ...of Querandis; and it appears that they call themselves Puelches, and various other names; for each division of this nation has a different appellation. At the period of the first arrival of the Spaniards in that country, they wandered about the southern side of the River Plate, opposite the Charruas' territory, but without any communication with them, as they had no canoes. On the western side, they had the Guaranis of Monte Grande, and of the Santiago valley--points that are now called San Ysidor, or Las Conchas: on the other two sides they had no neighbours. This nation disputed the ground with the founders of Buenos Ayres, with a vigour, constancy, and valour truly admirable. The Spaniards, after considerable losses, abandoned the place; but returned a second time to undertake the foundation of that city; and, as they were then in possession of a strong cavalry, the Pampas could not make head against them, and withdrew towards the south. In their new country they lived as before, hunting deer and ostriches, which were abundant; but when the wild horses became numerous, they began to hunt them too, and kill them for the sake of their flesh, which they ate. After the horses, the wild horned cattle multiplied also; and, as the Pampas Indians did not require them for food, they never thought of eating their flesh, and do not even to this day. Consequently, these cattle found no obstacle to their increase, and continued multiplying and extending, even to the Black River, towards lat. 41 south, and in the same proportion to the west, as far as the boundary of Mendoza, and the Chilian branches of the Andes. The Indians of these last places, on seeing these, to them, new animals, began to eat their flesh; and, as they became very abundant by rapid...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236682599
  • 9781236682598