Statistics and Information Concerning the State of Missouri; And Its Cheap Farming Lands, the Grazing and Dairy Region, the Mineral and Timber Resources, the Unsurpassed Fruit Lands, and Limitless Opportunities for Labor and Capital

Statistics and Information Concerning the State of Missouri; And Its Cheap Farming Lands, the Grazing and Dairy Region, the Mineral and Timber Resources, the Unsurpassed Fruit Lands, and Limitless Opportunities for Labor and Capital

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ...from which fruit cannot find direct and convenient transportation to a market which is never overstocked. All roads lead to St. Louis which is the greatesl fruit market of the West. Then in later years there have sprung up on the west, the great consuming centers of Kansas City and St. Joseph, which annually require a great and ever increasing supply. Besides these mammoth market places, the fruit growers of Missouri can ship their surplus to Iowa, Minnesota and Dakota where there is growing up an enormous demand for it. A great population is growing up in the western fruitless region which must be supplied and Missouri will always have the advantage of location in meeting the demand from this source. From the western portion of the State there are direct lines of transportation to the mines in the West, and the southern and southeastern sections have their capacity taxed to the utmost, to supply the needs of Texas and the rapidly growing Southwest which part of the country is reached by the Iron Mountain route. All these can be safely sent hundreds of miles to market and the great network of railroads radiating from St. Louis, and permeating the country in every direction, enables the fruit growers of Missouri to sell their products to the inhabitants of all that vast money-making, non-fruitgrowing, but fruit-consuming country extending westward to the Rocky Mountains, and from British America to Mexico, and to find a profitable market in the States north, northwest and northeast of them. Perhaps no better proof can be given of the grand excellence of Missouri fruits than the fact that at several late meetings of the American Pomological Society, medals were awarded to Missouri for the best display of apples, pears and wines, and also for the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236538056
  • 9781236538055