Statement Presented on Behalf of Chile in Reply to the Argentine Report Submitted to the Tribunal Constituted by H. B. Majesty's Government Acting as Arbitrator in Pursuance of the Agreement Dated April 17, 1896 Volume 2

Statement Presented on Behalf of Chile in Reply to the Argentine Report Submitted to the Tribunal Constituted by H. B. Majesty's Government Acting as Arbitrator in Pursuance of the Agreement Dated April 17, 1896 Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1901 edition. Excerpt: ...the only answer would be: Those forming the regular and normal hydrographic basins situated east and west of the "high crests." Thus-arguing in a circle--are the boundary " crests" defined in terms of "slopes" and the " slopes" in terms of "crests." Again, if instead of considering the definitions as a whole the details are taken into account, it will finally be seen that, according to the Argentine view the "principal chain," which should form the boundary, must combine the following conditions: I. (As to height) to contain the edge or general culminating line, the most prominent feature. 2. (As to continuity) to be the most " continued," to form a chain. 3. (As to direction) to keep the most uniform general direction. 4. (As an orographical line) to form the intersection of the eastern and western slope of the Cordillera. 5. (As a hydrographical line) to form the normal watershed that divides the greatest volume of water. 6. (As to aspect) to be easy to distinguish. 7. (As to access) to be generally impracticable, difficult to cross. 8. (As to meteorology) to form a snow-line between the two countries. Thus the Argentine Representative--his opinion of the inopportuneness of raising abstract or theoretical questions notwitl1standing---has thought fit to subject the boundary line to every condition that seemed to him desirable, and appears to be labouring under the conviction, on the one hand, that a line which combines such conditions cannot be rejected, and, on the other that no line which does not combine them can be accepted as being the line of the Treaty. "t1: 't';;'" However. three reasons will be given to account...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 136 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 254g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236875842
  • 9781236875846